Category: May 2018 Issue

Delivering success with FoodSquire

Marshfield start-up leverages technology and service to beat the competition By Douglas Karlson We order books online, as well as clothes, groceries, and almost anything else you can think of. But when it comes to restaurant takeout, most people still rely on the telephone. Th­at didn’t make sense to Joe Capone, founder of Marshfield-based start-up, FoodSquire, who’s leveraging technology and local service to prove that ordering restaurant meals online is easy, efficient, and less prone to errors. Capone came up with the idea for FoodSquire two-and-a-half years ago. As an entrepreneur running a successful web development company called Webier,...

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Changing the world, one step at a time: Manomet has been pursuing economic conservation for 50 years

By Ann Luongo Manomet Bird Observatory was founded in 1969 as a bird research organization dedicated to the conservation of nature. Located in the village of Manomet, in Plymouth, and now known simply as “Manomet,” the 501(c)(3) nonprofit group works to build science-based, cooperative solutions to environmental problems. Over the past 50 years, the organization has expanded its work into forestry and agriculture to tackle environmental conservation. In the last decade, they’ve added a sustainable economies program to improve the balance between nature and the economy. John Hagan began his career at Manomet in 1986, when he joined the...

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A Nurturing Enterprise: How the Merrow Sewing Machine Company is reinvigorating its community

By Douglas Karlson It has survived explosions, fire, depressions, and competition from China, and the Merrow Sewing Machine Company is still here and thriving, after 180 years. Its secret: a willingness to adopt new technology and to evolve. Th­e company’s origins date back more than seven generations, to Connecticut, where the first enterprising Merrow manufactured gunpowder. An explosion put an end to that, and in 1838 the business turned to the manufacture of knitted goods. ­at led to the invention and manufacture of sewing machines, which, following a fire that destroyed the knitting mill, became the company’s core business....

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Entrepreneurship: 6 Forces Shaping the Future of Work

By Ja-Nae Duane How we pay for things has changed dramatically during the last 20 years. We’ve gone from handing over cash and writing checks to swiping cards and tapping watches. At the beginning of this trend, many people couldn’t fathom how we’d move to these new-fangled cards, let alone use smartphones like a digital wallet. But this trend has opened the door to new services like Stripe and Apple Pay. On top of these services, other companies have found ways to reach new customers and make the payment/service process seamless. As part of ­The Startup Equation, we understood...

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Office Equipment: How work flow can determine cost of ownership

By Ken Pedicini I have been in the office equipment industry for almost 40 years. After graduating from Boston College in 1979 I started with Savin Corp. at their Boston branch selling an $8,000 word processing device, which was basically a very large typewriter with no screen, and in 1983 I left the Savin Branch and launched KenMark with my now-retired partner Mark Brainson. Office equipment has come a long way from your basic typewriters, copiers and fax machines. Back in the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s, people used to just hit a button to make a photocopy. With the...

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